Q: How long have you worked at UOW?

Twenty seven years.

 

Q. What’s your/your team’s role at the University?  

Bringing Geotechnical Engineering research to the world stage and in turn impacting industry.

 

Q. What’s the most rewarding part of your job?

Seeing my PhD students graduating and contributing to industry and academia.

 

Q. What’s the most challenging?

Remaining constantly at the front of research and subsequently knowing I have made a significant and tangible contribution.

 

Q. Proudest work achievement at UOW?

Becoming a Distinguished Professor and then securing the ARC Industrial Transformation Training Centre for Advanced Railway Technologies.

 

Q: What goals are you/your team working towards in 2018?

The biggest goal is to take Australian heavy haul railways to the top of the world in track design through R&D.

 

Q. What’s your fondest memory so far of working at UOW?  

I am very honoured to have received various national and international awards but I am particularly proud to have received the UOW Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Research in 2010 and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Research Partnership in 2013.

 

Q. Random fact about you or hidden talent?

Hidden talent would be playing the piano by ear. My wife and I also take great pride in our charitable work aiding children with leukaemia, volunteering for the Red Cross and assisting those affected by natural hazards, especially in developing countries.

 

Q. What’s your favourite place in the world and why?

Kandy, Sri Lanka, as it’s so peaceful and beautiful – and happens to be my birthplace.

 

Q. Something on your bucket list you would care to share?

It’s not really bucket list material but I have two key interests I dream of maintaining for the rest of my life – to be surrounded by dogs and to maintain my obsession with colour enhancing of Koi fish. I have been experimenting with various types of food and water chemistry that enhance the colour intensity of Koi.